Posts Tagged ‘resources’

We need a Google Tips clearinghouse

March 21, 2010

Since becoming a Google Certified Teacher, I’ve come across so many great technology resources, tips, and contacts that they’re impossible to enumerate.  It seems like everyone has a little corner of the web set aside to share their ideas.  I’m working on one myself to support my upcoming workshop, Go Paperless with Free Google Tools.

I was looking at Kathy Schrock‘s Google Goodies page, and I found this neat trick:

If you publish a Google Doc or Spreadsheet, and you want your users to have their own copy of the document or template, forward them the URL with &newcopy appended to the end of it.

What we need is a common clearinghouse for all of these sorts of Google tips and tricks.  Each Google tool has its own help documentation and associated forum, but I’m not sure that’s the right place for it.  The email traffic from the Google Certified Teachers discussion group is rich in resources and tips, but it is only open to the GCT community.  The Google Teacher Academy resources page is a start, but it’s not exactly what I have in mind.

What to do…

Advertisements

NCSSSMST Presentation: Google Is Not the Enemy

March 8, 2010

Last Wednesday through Saturday I attended the National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science, and Technology Professional Conference.  The acronym isn’t much better:  NCSSSMST.  I attended a workshop on social media by Corey Alderdice of the Gatton Academy, a session on using robotics to stimulate interest in STEM topics by David Platt from Wheeler High School Center for Advanced Studies, and I spent a couple of hours with the LASA E-Zine folks.

Our librarian Alaine Martaus and I presented a session called Google Is Not the Enemy, demonstrating the Google search tools and techniques that students can use to access legitimate sources online.  Alaine demonstrated Google Scholar, Google Books, and Google Patent Search.  I introduced Google Alerts, Wonder Wheel, Timeline Search, and Google Squared.  You may recognize some of the slides in this presentation from Searchin’ Like It’s 1999.

Led by a Google Certified Teacher, this session is designed to familiarize faculty who guide student research on the finer points of using Google’s specialized search tools and applications for advanced research results. Though many students rely heavily on the standard Google search for their research needs, faculty are increasingly wary of the reliability and accuracy of the information accessed through this generalized web search engine. The primary method of preventing unverified information from making its way into student writing has been to educate students in methods of website evaluation. What this session aims to do is present an additional method that involves using specialized search tools and scholarly applications available from Google that will improve the overall quality of all sources found through online searches. Using information gained at the selective Google Teacher Academy, this session means to demonstrate a variety of Google applications that will be of use both to students in their research and to teachers. The session will also discuss the advantages of building on the familiar foundation of Google searching, which is already so popular with students. Lastly the session will touch briefly on some of the controversies and worries that teachers often have about Google with the hopes that open discussion will alleviate any concerns about using Google tools more fully in the classroom.

We had some spare time at the end of the session, so we demonstrated the Google Applications for Education suite offered free to schools.  One very excited participant ran out of the room asking her colleague, “Why aren’t we doing this?  I don’t understand exactly what it is, but it’s wonderful!”  Several expressed interest in my 3-day summer workshop, “Go Paperless with Free Google Tools.”  More on that in a future post.

NCSSSMST conferencegoers enjoyed an evening at Nashville’s Wildhorse Saloon. Line dancing lessons were complimentary for the uninhibited.  See that video after the break.

Read the rest of this entry »

Five technologies I use every day

October 19, 2008

Just to get the ball rolling, let’s start with a week-long series featuring 5 of the technologies I use in my classroom every day.  In preparing for this series, I tried several times to find a ranking system that made sense, but in my mind all of them are so closely linked that I couldn’t pick a “winner.”

Starting on Monday, I will post one technology per day that I use in my classroom.  I’ll provide links to resources on where to get these technologies and how others are using them, and I hope we can get a conversation going.

Check back on Monday!